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Julius Caesar

Julius Caesar

 Julius Caesar
 Julius Caesar

About the Book

The year is 44 BC and Julius Caesar is at the height of his powers, bestriding “the narrow world” like “a Colossus”. A conspiracy is formed by a group of Roman senators who realize that for the republic to be saved, Caesar must be assassinated. But the senators have different motives: some are spurred on by envy of Caesar's greatness and others, by their patriotism and love for Rome. Unwittingly, they set the course for one of the bloodiest civil wars in history and the eventual collapse of the great Roman republic.

ISBN-13 9788129101914ISBN-10 -Pages 104 Publication Date
Author Shakespeare Publisher Rupa Publication Language English Category Fiction Reference FormatPhysical
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    A. Howe

    December 11, 2008

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    Brilliant!

    This recording just about saved my life. Seriously. Although I have taught Romeo & Juliet to high school freshmen about a million times, this year I was tapped to teach a class of sophomores reading...gulp...JULIUS CAESAR! This was never my favorite of Shakespeare's plays, and most of my memories of it derived from my own dreadfully dull tenth grade experience.When I began reading the play with my own students, it didn't take any of us long to realize that their halting, stilted, first-time line-readings would make the play more difficult for them to interpret and enjoy. So, over a long weekend, I ordered Arkangel's recording. I had no idea that this recording would actually change my opinion of the play itself!My students and I became completely captivated by the characters of Caesar as performed by the brilliant actors involved in this recording. John Bowe as Brutus and Adrian Lester as Antony impressed us particularly--their famous speeches to the people of...

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    Daniel B.

    October 21, 2014

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    JULIUS CAESAR Shakespeare's New Vision of Tragedy

    JULIUS CAESAR is Shakespeare's first mature tragedy, and it announced a shift in focus for the Globe's Theater's specialist in festive comedies toward the writing of tragedies. There are certainly increasing tragic elements in plays from Titus Adronicus onward, but it is Julius Caesar that presents a completely new tragic drama. It contains its own past and present and then launches into terra incognito. The Old Tragedy was based on a mechanical view of fortune/fate: human life was attached to a Wheel of Fortune At some point a man reached his terminus and tumbled off. Even great ones have no way to hold on. However, this purely mechanical vehicle of Fate is replaced in JULIUS CAESAR by a moral force expressed in imagery: THERE IS A TIDE IN THE AFFAIRS OF MEN etc. There is nothing passive here. Men must be observant, seize the moment. play the cards dealt. Cassius is a uniquely Elizabethan tragic hero known as a Malcontent. His struggles are with external conditions and opponents...

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    P. Webster "Phil W."

    July 24, 2012

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    And Brutus is an honourable man

    Julius Caesar is one of my favourite Shakespeare plays, combining as it does some wonderful poetry with the drama of a historical tragedy.Shakespeare, characteristically, does not take sides. Are Brutus, Cassius and their co-conspirators striking a blow for freedom, or is their plot an unjustifiable and treacherous murder? Shakespeare does not tell us what to think; he puts the arguments of both sides into the mouths of his characters and leaves us to decide for ourselves.The only problem I have with the play is the way that the Roman masses are portrayed as a fickle mob who are easily swayed by the speeches of demagogues. Nevertheless, the scene where Mark Antony turns the crowd from supporting the actions of the assassins to wanting to hunt them down and kill them is marvellous drama. Especially clever is Antony's increasingly ironic use of the phrase, "And Brutus is an honourable man."Shakespeare's slightly patronising attitude to the common...

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    E. A Solinas "ea_solinas"

    January 6, 2011

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    Go, go, good countrymen...

    Gaius Julius C?sar is the Caesar we think of when we hear the word "Caesar" -- he conquered Gaul, bedded Cleopatra, and died a pretty dramatic death. And while he only appears in a few scenes of "Julius Caesar," he's the nucleus that William Shakespeare's taut conspiracy play revolves around -- his murder, his legacy, and the bitter jealousy he inspired.Julius Caesar is returning to Rome in triumph, only to be stopped by a strange old soothsayer who warns him, "Beware the ides of March." Caesar brushes off the warning, but he has no idea that a conspiracy is brewing under his nose. In a nutshell, a group of senators led by the creepy Cassius are plotting against Caesar because of his wild popularity, suspecting that he wants to become KING.And Cassius' latest target: Brutus, one of Caesar's best buddies. Brutus is slowly swayed over to the conspiracy's side, beginning to believe that Caesar as a great man corrupted by power. Everything comes to a a devastating...

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    Improve Your English

    May 11, 2014

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    Excellent balance between original text and notes

    These editions are my favorite ones to use with middle and high school students. They are slim; the page layout is attractive, with lots of white space and good illustrations; and the glossed words are well-chosen, the glosses well-done. In addition, the book provides useful background notes and act / scene summaries.In the past I have tried the following editions:Folger Library. Popular in schools, and easily the runner-up for an edition. My only objection is that the contemporary images (for instance, the title page of a 16th-century fencing manual) don't draw the readers into the text. Also, the textual apparatus is distracting; high school students don't need to know which old edition the editor has drawn on for a particular line.Cambridge School Shakespeare. A very good resource for a classroom teacher looking for activities that will draw the students into the text. However, sometimes the text gets lost in the activities. The book is also a...

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    Sean Ares Hirsch

    April 14, 2000

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    Shakespeare Outdoes Himself!

    This was the first play performed at the Globe Theatre. For that reason alone, this play deserves special attention. But the characters, the language, and this interesting situation represent Shakespeare's finest efforts. Cassius is ruthless with a malicious attitude. But he honestly fears what Caesar will do if he is crowned. Brutus is a good and honest man. He contemplates joining Cassius to kill Caesar despite the fact that Caesar loves him as a friend. (In history as well, Caesar was notably kind to Brutus.) But yet he too fears that if Caesar is crowned, Rome will bleed. Mark Antony is convincing as Caesar's loyal aid who SEEMS insignificant at first. But after Caesar is killed, he emerges as the most powerful and intelligent character in the play. What makes this play so phenomenal is that we can easily understand and sympathize with any of these major characters. (Even though they are on opposite sides.) What's left? Only chilling omens like the Soothsayer, the...

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    Robert M Ettimger

    May 27, 2004

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    Not a Casual Read.

    Before I begin, I would like to point out three things. One, I am only a middle-school student (this was an honours class project); two, this is my first review; three, I am reviewing the unabridged, original dialogue version. Thank you.William Shakespeare is hailed as the greatest writer ever, yet (based on people I've met) very few people have read even a single one of his works. I expected it to be required reading in high school or, at the very least, college. Alas, it is not. This is a disappointment, as I truly enjoyed reading this play, my first encounter with Shakespeare.Julius Caesar is a tale of honor and betrayal. Pompey, a beloved Roman leader, is defeated in civil war with Caesar. A small brotherhood, let by Marcus Brutus, is still devoted to him after his death, and wants nothing less than the assassination of their new leader. I had expected Caesar's death ("Et tu, Bruté? Then fall Caesar.") to be near the end of the book. However, it...

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    Andy Kelley

    February 14, 2006

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    The classic book report... with a twist.

    We all know the story of Julius Caesar. The tragic event that led to chaos. Though it is a popular television and movie theme, we know it in large part due to Julius Caesar, William Shakespeare's famed play. It includes moving scenes such as Caesar's infamous "Et tu Brute", and Marc Antony's moving "Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears." This book, put together by Folger Shakespeare Library, helps to bring this story to life. This book, about 239 pages total, features "explanatory notes conveniently placed on pages facing the text of the play." While these notes may not answer every question you might come up with, I believe they are very helpful to the average reader (such as myself). These pages also provide plenty of room for anyone who prefers to annotate, or write down thoughts, in their books.Also featured on these pages is a scene summary for every scene. The scene summaries really helped me truly understand the Shakespearian language. I...

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